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Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
A school district in South Carolina lost access to data on close to half of the servers in its data center sometime over the summer. In what the district characterized as a ransomware attack, data on the servers was encrypted and as a result made inaccessible by its staff, Dorchester School District Two said in a statement, assuring student and staff that no personal information had been compromised.
"A thorough investigation determined this was a ransom request and there was no identity theft involved and no student or staff information had been accessed or compromised," the statement read.
After negotiations (presumably with the attackers), the district paid a $2,900 ransom to decrypt the files.
Ransomware attacks, where the attackers demand money (usually in the form of cryptocurrency) in exchange for giving the victim access to their data, have become commonplace in recent years, most of them targeting individual users. But attacks on organizations have been on the rise.
Earlier this year, two global-scale ransomware attacks targeted organizations large and small. The so-called WannaCry attack in May spread across more than 150 countries, affecting among others Britain's National Health Service. The following month, a second attack, which spread a virus called Petya, affected healthcare providers around the world, as well as companies like Maersk and FedEx.
The Dorchester school district did not specify when the
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Cloud computing companies in the U.S. could lose more than $10 billion by 2020 as a result of the Trump administration's reputation regarding data privacy, according to Swiss hosting company Artmotion.
A whitepaper published by Artmotion suggests that growth rate in U.S. cloud revenue relative to the rest of the world will decline significantly more than previously forecast by IDC.
See also: Tech Goes From White House to Doghouse in Trump's Washington
IDC's Worldwide Public Cloud Services Spending Guide predicts that the U.S. will account for 60 percent of cloud revenue worldwide to 2020. The same research, however, suggests revenue growth in the U.S. will be lower than that in all seven other regions analyzed by IDC, and according to Artmotion does not take into account the sharply falling confidence businesses have in the capacity of U.S. companies to protect the privacy of data in the cloud.
"While these figures may be concerning for U.S. service providers already, they don't take full account of the scale of the disapproval of President Trump's actions since taking office," according to Mateo Meier, CEO of Artmotion.
Artmotion's own research shows that half of U.S. and U.K. citizens feel online data privacy is less secure under President Trump. Further, 24 percent are most concerned about their own government, while only 20 percent consider the Russian government most concerning, and 15 percent fear the Chinese government. Both Russia and
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(Bloomberg) — VMware Inc. stock has gained almost 50 percent since last October, riding a wave of optimism about a partnership with Amazon.com Inc. that was meant to save the software maker from oblivion as customers shifted more of their systems to the cloud.
The accord was announced with fanfare last year as a way for VMware to keep close ties to clients even as they move to internet-based computing – a business Amazon dominates, and one where VMware lagged. It was seen as a win for all parties. Customers that rely on VMware's software for making servers more efficient could move some of their applications – for whatever the task, be it billing, payroll or email – over to Amazon's cloud service without having to completely rewrite them. The resulting product, VMware Cloud on AWS, was released on Monday, with VMware Chief Executive Officer Pat Gelsinger and Amazon Web Services CEO Andy Jassy touting the release at VMware's big annual conference in Las Vegas.
See also: You Can Now Spin Up VMware Servers in Amazon Data Centers
Here's the problem: there's nothing keeping Amazon from developing its own competing set of products down the road. Should that happen, VMware would be poised to lose customers – including some that it helped introduce to Amazon Web Services through this partnership.
"We'll have to see how this relationship evolves over the next three to five years, but that is the thing that VMware will have to navigate very
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Brought to you by Talkin' Cloud
SolarWinds MSP announced Tuesday that it has acquired SpamExperts, an Amsterdam-based mail security solutions provider. The terms of the deal have not been disclosed.
Founded in 2005, SpamExperts offers SaaS-based mail protection and mail archiving services for IT service providers, including web hosts, MSPs, ISPs and telcos. In a statement, SolarWinds MSP says that SpamExperts will augment its SolarWinds MSP Mail offering, promising to provide more details in the next 30 days.
See also: SpamExperts Releases Open Source Anti-Spam Framework OrangeAssassin
In an email to partners, posted to the Web Hosting Talk forum, SpamExperts said that the acquisition will bring no immediate changes, only more opportunities.
We have some exciting news to share with you.
SpamExperts has been acquired by SolarWinds® MSP the leading global provider of comprehensive, scalable IT service management solutions.
As you know, SpamExperts has provided SaaS-based mail protection and mail archiving services for best-in-class MSPs, ISPs, telcos, and other IT service providers globally for more than ten years. SolarWinds MSP empowers more than 20,000 IT service providers worldwide with technologies to fuel their success. Solutions that integrate layered security, collective intelligence, and smart automation—both on-premises and in the cloud, backed by actionable data insights, help IT service providers get the job done easier and faster. SolarWinds MSP
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Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
Data centers these days are busy replacing expensive hardware solutions with "software-defined" everything, but the trend is the opposite when it comes to security. While software still prevails in keeping servers secure, hardware is often being added to the mix as another layer of protection, especially during the boot process, when a computer is vulnerable to dangers such as maliciously modified firmware.
This trend started when UEFI — and Secure Boot — replaced BIOS on computers, and was carried a step further when Google began including an additional custom designed hardware security chip on all servers and peripherals in its data centers. In June, Hewlett Packard Enterprise followed suit and announced it was joining the secured-by-hardware crowd by including its own custom chip on its Gen10 servers. Lenovo also includes a degree of security-on-a-chip technology on its line of servers, through XClarity Controller.
There are several advantages to having security protections contained in chipsets that are separate from a server's CPUs. Being isolated from the server's main components, they are more difficult for an outside hacker who manages to get through a system's defenses to find and penetrate. In addition, they can utilize read-only memory that can be difficult or impossible to modify.
See also: Here's How Google Secures Its Cloud
At its Cloud Next event in March, Google unveiled a custom security chip
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Data centers these days are busy replacing expensive hardware solutions with "software-defined" everything, but the trend is the opposite when it comes to security.
Read more

Filed under Web Hosting News by on #